Tag: zlatan

Are professional footballers criminally underpaid?

Are professional footballers criminally underpaid?

The discussion of footballers being overpaid is something that is often ranted about in the modern era, often comparing their wages to people in the armed forces. So I thought that I would do some research to hopefully explain to those that have no clue on the subject just where the money from football goes. For this post I will use Manchester United as my example, just to show how much the players earn in comparison to how much the club makes.

So in 2016, Manchester United made a total of £515.3m, this is just what they brought in to the club, without spending their money elsewhere on transfers and wages. Obviously, this money was earned from shirt sales, worldwide deals, television revenue and sponsorships. The profit that was made from the £515.3m after it had been invested elsewhere was around £167m. So where exactly does this profit go? The main shareholders of Manchester United are Delaware which is a company based in the USA, it has strong affiliations with the person that officially invested into the club in 2004, Malcolm Glazer. Delaware have about 67% of the shares, and there are six representatives that get the money between them. 67% of £167m is just under £112m, splitting £112m between 6 would equate to an estimated £18.6m that these people get for literally being in the hierarchy of the Delaware. Are these the reason that Manchester United have the reputation that they currently have and the historic national/continental success they have experienced? No, absolutely not! The highest earner at Manchester United reportedly is Zlatan Ibrahimovic who makes £19.1m, the next highest earner comes way below the £18.6m mark that the 6 shareholders will gain. For example, Marcus Rashford who was a main part of Manchester United’s success in 2016 only earned as little as £2.5m.. this makes the figure seem incredibly small.

So in conclusion, the money that footballers actually earn is probably not as much as they should get. Just like Marcus Rashford and many other ‘superstars’ that play for Manchester United. It is not their faults that football is of so much interest, and that their club is a Worldwide business. The lesson from this is that footballers do their jobs, and make great money for their business, therefore their money is either justified, or not enough.